Chinese Venison Jerky (How to Cut Venison Jerky)

This Chinese venison jerk recipe will also show you how to cut venison jerky for any recipe you want to use to preserve your wild game meat.

I love jerky and I love Chinese food, which is why you can trust that this Chinese venison jerky recipe stays true to the classic Chinese flavours that I know and adore.

To be honest, few meaty things make my little heart pitter patter (hopefully not with a heart attack) than an Asian-style jerky marinade. That Chinese-style pork jerky from BKH Jerky on Fraser Street in Vancouver? So sweet, so savoury, so smokey! Be still, my heart!

Of course, Chinese-style jerky that BKH famously makes isn’t the jerky we’ll be able to make after a successful deer hunting season. Instead, I’ve adapted my favourite Chinese flavours to fit with the venison I have in the freezer and dehydrator I have available to me.

Here’s a breakdown of how to cut venison jerky (a very contentious subject) and my Chinese venison jerky recipe with pictures to guide you along the way. Happy chewing!

Note: The longer you marinate and dry the jerky for, the longer it can be stored for. If you marinate it for a full day and completely dry it out, you can store it outside of the fridge in a sealed bag. I marinate jerky for less time and stop drying it when it’s still pretty chewable, so I store it in the fridge.

How to Cut Venison Jerky

How to cut venison jerky – or rather, where to cut venison for jerky – is an oft-contended topic on the internet.

Some people argue that you should cut with the grain and other people insist that you should cut against the grain. What’s a confused jerky chef to do?

It’s actually pretty simple. Cutting totally against the grain will leave you with short, stubby pieces of crumbly jerky that will fall apart in your mouth, resulting in a very undesirably un-chewy snack.

On the other hand, if you cut totally with the grain, you may never stop chewing, ever.

I like to cut my venison jerky with the grain at a slight diagonal to try to get the best of both worlds in regards to tenderness and chew.

Here’s a picture of exactly how I would cut a venison bottom round roast, my favourite cut for venison jerky.

chinese venison jerky how to cut venison jerky

Cooking Chinese Venison Jerky

Cut venison into 1/8″ strips according to how to cut venison jerky instructions above.

Combine all ingredients in a freezer bag and marinate in the fridge for 3-24 hours.

chinese venison jerky how to cut venison jerky

Drain venison dry and place strips in dehydrator rack, ensuring that they don’t touch. Set dehydrator on high and let dry for 2 hours at 160 degrees.

Lower the temperature to 145 degrees until the jerky is dried to your liking, around 6 hours (dry, but tender and chewy).

chinese venison jerky how to cut venison jerky

Store Chinese venison jerky in a sealed bag in the fridge or freezer until ready to enjoy!

chinese venison jerky how to cut venison jerky

Chinese Venison Jerky Recipe

Chinese Venison Jerky

Chinese venison jerky is a great way to preserve seasonal wild game using traditional East Asian flavors like Chinese five spice and soy. 

Course Snack
Cuisine Asian, Chinese, East Asian, Pacific Northwest, Venison, West Coast, Wild Game
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
Resting time 3 hours
Total Time 2 hours 5 minutes
Servings 10
Author The Homesteading Huntress

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs venison bottom round, partially frozen with excess fat and silver skin removed (or other suitable venison cut)
  • 1/2 c. soy sauce
  • 1/4 c. worcestershire sauce
  • 4 tbsp Chinese cooking wine
  • 4 tbsp honey
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp liquid smoke
  • 2 tsp five spice powder
  • 1 tsp white pepper (can substitute with black pepper)
  • 1 tsp chili flakes
  • 2 inches ginger, peeled and sliced

Instructions

  1. Cut venison into ⅛” strips with the grain at a slight diagonal. 

  2. Combine all ingredients in a freezer bag and marinade in the fridge for 3-24 hours depending on how salty you want your jerky and how long you’ll be storing it for.

  3. Drain venison dry on racks and throw out the brine. Place strips in dehydrator so that they’re not touching, set dehydrator on high, and let for 2 hours at 160 degrees, and then lower temperature to 145 degrees until the jerky is dried to your liking, around 6 hours (I prefer mine dry, but still tender and chewy).

  4. Store in a sealed freezer bag in the fridge or freezer.

Posted by Arielle

Arielle is a passionate urban homesteader and hunter located in Vancouver and the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia.

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