How to Make Apple Vinegar From Cores and Peels

Naturally fermented apple vinegar from cores and peels is a great way to use food waste that would otherwise be composted or thrown away.

Naturally fermented apple vinegar is an excellent addition to salad dressings or a healthy option to combine with water as a drink packed with probiotics.

I learned how to make apple vinegar from cores and peels because I eat, process, and serve a ridiculous amount of local apples every year, but I hated wasting the apple cores and peels.

In the fall, I go through pounds upon pounds of apples making spiced apple butter, spiced and sugared apple chips, and flakey apple pies, but the entire time I was throwing bags of apple cores and peels into the compost bin in my apartment building. It was a damn shame!

I knew there had to be a way I could put these apple peels and cores to good use, but I wasn’t sure how to do it. However, eventually I heard my partner’s father talking about how he makes apple vinegar from cores and peels.

Making apple vinegar from cores and peels was the perfect solution, as I already use lots of vinegar making salad dressings at home. I would start to make my own apple vinegar with a vinegar SCOBY instead of buying processed vinegar from a store!

While many people use this apple core and peel method to make vinegar, the resulting vinegar often incorrectly called apple cider vinegar. While apple cider vinegar is the most common type of apple vinegar, there’s no cider here, so technically this is apple vinegar, not apple cider vinegar.

Preparing Apple Vinegar From Cores and Peels

apple vinegar from cores and peels

Sanitize mason jar and food safe weight with solution.

Pack apple cores and peels tightly in your fermentation container (I used a 2 L mason jar) and weigh them down with a food safe weight, such as a sanitized 1/2 cup mason jar.

apple vinegar from cores and peels

Pour water and sugar solution into the mason jars over the food weight, submerging the apple cores and peels so that no apple pieces are floating on the surface.

Cover the mason jar with a coffee filter and secure with a rubber band to prevent pests or dust from entering the naturally fermented apple vinegar.

apple vinegar from cores and peels

Check the naturally fermented apple vinegar every day for 2 weeks, pushing apple pieces under the sugar solution if necessary.

Skim any white scum or mold (see troubleshooting) and taste apple vinegar periodically to check for desired sourness.

Strain apple vinegar in a sanitized container, cover with a coffee filter, and secure with a rubber band. Check on the fermented apple vinegar every day until it’s ready, approximately one week.

When your DIY apple vinegar reaches your preferred level of sourness, stop the fermentation by covering it with a lid and storing in the refrigerator.

Apple Vinegar From Cores and Peels: Troubleshooting

Help, my apple vinegar has a white scum growing on it!

Don’t worry, white scum isn’t anything to worry about when it comes to making your own homemade apple vinegar.

Just skim the white scum off immediately when you see it, push the apples below the water and sugar solution, and make sure you’re checking the vinegar daily to inhibit the growth and spread of the white scum.

Help, my apple vinegar has white mold growing on it!

While white mold isn’t ideal for apple vinegar, it isn’t particularly dangerous, either.

Simply remove the white mold by skimming it off the surface of the vinegar and any moldy apple cores and peels when you notice it. Push the apples below the water and sugar solution and make sure you’re checking the vinegar daily to inhibit the growth and spread of any more white mold.

Help, my apple vinegar has something weird growing in it!

Okay, there a few different reasons why your apple vinegar could be growing something inside of it. If your apple vinegar smells and tastes normal, it’s probably a vinegar SCOBY, which is a bacterial culture that’s actually really good to have in your homemade vinegar. Don’t throw it out!

On the other hand, if there’s something really weird growing in your vinegar, such as a non-white coloured mold or black fuzzy stuff or an alien lifeform, you should probably throw your apple vinegar away and start a fresh batch.

Help, my apple vinegar is bubbling and warm!

Congratulations, your apple vinegar is successfully fermenting!

Bubbles and a warm temperature are good news for urban homesteaders and DIY-ers who are looking for a healthy and active fermentation. Bubbles and a warm temperature are signs that everything is going smoothly for your apple vinegar.

Help, my apple vinegar has a weird mold/smells terrible/tastes weird!

If your apple vinegar is growing a mold that isn’t white, smells inedible, or tastes bad in some way, you should probably play it safe by throwing away your batch of apple vinegar and trying again. As always, if you’re not comfortable eating or drinking something, don’t!

Apple Vinegar From Cores and Peels Recipe

Apple Vinegar From Cores and Peels

Naturally fermented apple vinegar from cores and peels is a great way to use food waste that would otherwise be composted or thrown away.

Course Drinks, Fermenting
Cuisine Canadian, Pacific Northwest, West Coast
Prep Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 10
Author The Homesteading Huntress

Ingredients

  • 1 lb apple cores and peels
  • 1 c. water to 1 tbsp sugar solution (double as necessary)

Equipment

  • no-rinse sanitizer
  • 2 L mason jar
  • coffee filter and rubber band
  • food safe weight (such as 1/2 c. mason jar)

Instructions

  1. Dissolve no-rinse sanitizer into water until powder is dissolved, and then rinse mason jar and food safe weight with solution. 

  2. Pack apple cores and peels tightly into the mason jar and weigh down with a food safe weight

  3. Pour water and sugar solution into the mason jars, fully submerging the apple cores and peels under the liquid so that no apple pieces are floating on the surface. Cover mason jar with coffee filter and secure with a rubber band.

  4. Check the mason jar every day for two weeks, pushing apples pieces under the liquid if necessary and skimming off any white scum or white mold (see troubleshooting) and tasting the vinegar periodically to check for desired sourness.

  5. Strain apple vinegar into a sanitized container, cover with a coffee filter, and secure with a rubber band, and then check on it every day until it’s ready, approximately one week.

  6. When your vinegar reaches your preferred level of sourness, stop the fermentation by covering it with a lid and storing it in the refrigerator.

Posted by Arielle

Arielle is a passionate urban homesteader and hunter located in Vancouver and the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: